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 - Koisuru Boukun CD 5 {sexytime}
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Requested by anon~ This is the {sex scene} from the Koisuru Boukun Drama CD 5 (which corresponds to Volume 5 in the books), aka, the time they did it in Canada. THIS IS REALLY LONG, ABOUT 14 MINUTES, and it corresponds to when Souichi is in the shower until the end of the scene… [using headphones is a good idea too, omo].

Read along here, it goes from page 2 until the end up the scene on page 31, then it continues from this chapter here. I don’t remember if any parts are different in the drama CD than the manga.

You can download this audio clip here.

2 299 reproducciones

Koisuru Boukun Drama CD 5

Sempai’s little jack off scene ohohoho

Read along here [x] Page 15-29

HEADPHONES ALERT.

cozydark:

In Space, Infectious Diseases Reveal Their True Nature |

When you think about what’s going on hundreds of miles above the surface of the Earth at the International Space Station, you probably don’t think about salmonella. But it turns out that microgravity might reveal a thing or two about the nasty bacteria. Researcher Cheryl Nickerson took some salmonella up there to see what might happen, and what she found was quite surprising. Arizona State University writes:

During an earlier series of NASA space shuttle and ground-based experiments, Nickerson and her team made a startling discovery. Spaceflight culture increased the disease-causing potential (virulence) of the foodborne pathogen Salmonella, yet many of the genes known to be important for its virulence were not turned on and off as expected when this organism is grown on Earth. Understanding how this switching is regulated may be useful for designing targeted strategies to prevent infection.

In fact, the first time they brought salmonella to space and then came down, it returned three to seven times more virulent than the bug grown on the ground. NASA writes:

“We think space travel tricks Salmonella into behaving as if it is in the human gut,” Nickerson says. “It’s a mechanical phenomenon having to do with ‘fluid shear.’”

Basically, when salmonella move around, they can sense how strong the force of the fluid moving past them is. In the small intestine and stomach, that fluid is moving quickly. But if the salmonella can find its way to an alcove, a little nook in the wall of the intestine, that fluid shear goes way down. The salmonella can sense the change and picks that time to bloom. In space, fluid shear is extremely low. So the salmonella think they’re in their safe zone.

This fluid shear has all sorts of important functions to the cell, writes NASA:

As it turns out, many of the genes activated by the low fluid shear environment of spaceflight are involved in transporting these ions in and out of the cells, so there could be a connection. Research on this ion effect is still ongoing, Nickerson says, but she speculates that it could eventually lead to new ways to use these ions to ward off Salmonella infections.


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yellowchemistry:

CATALASE TEST.
Catalase is a common enzyme found in nearly all living organisms exposed to oxygen. It catalyzes the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide to water and oxygen. The reaction of catalase in the decomposition of living tissue:
2 H2O2 → 2 H2O + O2The catalase test is also one of the main three tests used by microbiologists to identify species of bacteria. The presence of catalase enzyme in the test isolate is detected using hydrogen peroxide. 
If the mixture produces bubbles or froth, the organism is said to be ‘catalase-positive’. Staphylococci and Micrococci are examples of catalase-positive bacteria.
If not, the organism is ‘catalase-negative’. Streptococcus and Enterococcus spp. are catalase-negative.
In the picture (right) a catalase-negative test (Streptococcus) and (left) a catalase positive one (Staphylococcus).
 
Thanks Nando for the picture.

yellowchemistry:

CATALASE TEST.

Catalase is a common enzyme found in nearly all living organisms exposed to oxygen. It catalyzes the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide to water and oxygenThe reaction of catalase in the decomposition of living tissue:

2 H2O2 → 2 H2O + O2
The catalase test is also one of the main three tests used by microbiologists to identify species of bacteria. The presence of catalase enzyme in the test isolate is detected using hydrogen peroxide. 

If the mixture produces bubbles or froth, the organism is said to be ‘catalase-positive’. Staphylococci and Micrococci are examples of catalase-positive bacteria.

If not, the organism is ‘catalase-negative’. Streptococcus and Enterococcus spp. are catalase-negative.

In the picture (right) a catalase-negative test (Streptococcus) and (left) a catalase positive one (Staphylococcus).

 

Thanks Nando for the picture.

thegreynotes:

Screwing around in microbiology lecture again…bacterial shapes as illustrated by cats ._.

thegreynotes:

Screwing around in microbiology lecture again…bacterial shapes as illustrated by cats ._.